Enhance Your Coffee Brewing with "Blooming"

Summer is finally here and ‘tis the season for blooms. And while I love the flowers as much as the next person, this season is all about coffee blooming!

 

Why should I bloom my coffee?

In a nutshell, fresh roasted coffee is chock-full of carbon dioxide, which can make your coffee slightly sour. By exposing those grounds to hot water, they release that CO2 in the form of bubbles. The escaping CO2 pushes water away from the beans, preventing the water from grabbing those delicious flavor molecules from the grinds before flowing into your cup.

Allowing your coffee to bloom allows the CO2 to escape, so the remaining water can fully absorb the flavor in the beans. This creates a fresher taste and brings out all of those fun flavor notes that different beans and roasts have to offer. Our Ethiopian Love Story is full of rich blackberry and blueberry notes and the San Agustin has bright fruity notes. Blooming these coffees beforehand will bring them out more!

And we’re not the only ones who love blooming our coffee. We talked to our friends at Fellow, a company that crafts brewing equipment for coffees and teas. “Starting your brew this way [...] helps negate a slightly sour taste from the CO2, while also increasing contact time between the water and grinds which ensures you're getting the evenest [coffee] extraction possible,” said Jessica Caisse, of Fellow.


How to bloom your coffee

To bloom your coffee, simply pour hot water over your grinds in a circular motion from the center, moving outwards. Add just enough to soak the coffee, about twice the weight of the coffee. Wait about 30 - 40 seconds while the coffee interacts with the water, and often creates bubbles as the CO2 escapes. Then, continue to brew your coffee as usual. Seriously, it’s that simple.

So, the next time you find yourself at home with an extra 30 to 40 seconds to spare, brew some coffee like the pros! Take the time out to bloom your Savorista coffee and let me know if you find a difference!

 

1 comment

Rose

Do I let the bloom water drain all the way out before adding new water? Or do I do a continuous flow during the bloom process?

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